CCNA 4 v6.0 Connecting Networks – CN Practice Skills Assessment – PT Option B

By | February 9, 2018
CCNA 4 v6.0 Connecting Networks – CN Practice Skills Assessment – PT Option B
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Connecting Networks – Skill-Based Assessment – Packet Tracer

Option B

A few things to keep in mind while completing this activity:

  1. Do not use the browser Back button or close or reload any Exam windows during the exam.
  2. Do not close Packet Tracer when you are done. It will close automatically.
  3. Click the Submit Assessment button to submit your work.
Objectives

In this Packet Tracer Skills Based Assessment, you will do as follows:

  • Configure PPP encapsulation and CHAP authentication for serial links.
  • Configure a GRE tunnel.
  • Configure OSPF.
  • Configure BGP.
  • Configure standard and extended IPv4 ACLs.
  • Configure IPv6 ACLs.

For the sake of time, many repetitive, but important, configuration tasks have been omitted from this assessment. Many of these tasks, especially those related to security, are essential elements of a network configuration. The intent of this activity is not to diminish the importance of full device configurations.

The IP addresses for all the devices have been configured and some of the routing configurations are already completed in this activity.

You are required to configure the devices as follows:

Remote:

  • Configure PPP and CHAP authentication on the appropriate interface.
  • Configure GRE tunnel.
  • Configure OSPF.
  • Configure standard IPv4 ACL.

Other:

  • Configure standard IPv4 ACLs.

Main:

  • Configure PPP and CHAP authentication on the appropriate interface.
  • Configure GRE tunnel.
  • Configure OSPF.
  • Configure standard and extended IPv4 ACLs.
  • Configure IPv6 ACLs.

Note: All the routers in AS 65001 are locked and no configurations are performed by the students. Furthermore, all the switches are pre-configured.

Addressing Table

Instructions
Step 1: Configure PPP encapsulation and authentication.

a.  Configure PPP encapsulation for the link between Main and ISP1 and the link between Remote and ISP1.

b.  Configure CHAP authentication between the links.

c.  Configure the correct username and the password 321cisco for CHAP authentication on both Main and Remote.

Step 2: Configure a GRE tunnel with routing.

a.  Configure a GRE tunnel between Main and Remote.

b.  Configure OSPF 1 to route the traffic between the LANs of Main and Remote through the GRE tunnel. Summarize the networks attached to Remote.

Step 3: Configure BGP.

Configure BGP between ISP1 in Internet cluster and 209.165.202.128/27 network on Main.

a.  Use AS number 65020 for Main.

b.  Configure ISP1 as the BGP neighbor.

c.  Only advertise the 209.165.202.128 / 27 network into BGP.

Step 4: Configure ACLs for NAT.

a.  Configure a standard access list numbered 1 on Remote to allow NAT for hosts in network 192.168.0.0 /23.

b.  Configure a standard access list numbered 1 on Main to allow NAT for hosts in network 192.168.2.0 /24.

c.  Configure a standard access list numbered 1 on Other to allow NAT for hosts in network 192.168.3.0 /24.

Step 5: Configure a standard ACL to restrict remote access to the Other router.

A standard ACL named VTY_ADMIN is configured to limit access via VTY to the Other router. This ACL will only allow hosts from the LAN attached to the G0/1 interface and the hosts from the LANs on Remote router to access the Other router. All the other connections to VTY should fail.

a.  Configure one ACL named VTY_ADMIN with three ACEs in the following order:

1)     Allow any hosts from the LAN attached to the G0/1 interface of Other router to access the router.

2)     Allow the hosts from the LANs in the Remote network to Other router remotely.

3)     All other remote connections are denied.

b.  Apply the ACL to the appropriate interface.

Note: Use the public IPv4 addresses in the ACLs when the private IPv4 addresses have been mapped to public IPv4 addresses.

Step 6: Configure an extended ACL to restrict access to the Main LAN.

a.  Configure an extended ACL named HTTP_ACCESS that allows Remote LANs, Other LANs and the LAN inside Main to access Main-Server via the web browser.

Configure this ACL with the following 5 ACEs in the following order:

1)     Allow the hosts from the Remote network to access the Main-Server.

2)     Allow the hosts from the Other LANs to access the Main-Server.

3)     Allow the internal network 192.168.2.0 /24 to access the Main-Server.

4)     Allow ICMP replies to Main-Server from any networks.

5)     Explicitly deny all other traffic from accessing the Main-Server.

b.  Apply the ACL to the Main G0/1 interface.

Note: Use the public IPv4 addresses in the ACLs when the private IPv4 addresses have been mapped to public IPv4 addresses.

Step 7: Configure an IPv6 access list to restrict access to the Main LAN.

a.  Configure an IPv6 access list named HTTP6_ACCESS that allows Remote LANs, Other LANs and the LAN inside Main to access Main-Server via the web browser.

b.  Configure this ACL with the following 6 ACEs in the following order:

1)     Allow the hosts from the Remote (2001:DB8:ACAD::/64) to access the Main-Server.

2)     Allow the hosts from the Remote (2001:DB8:ACAD:1::/64) to access the Main-Server.

3)     Allow the hosts from the Other LANs to access the Main-Server.

4)     Allow the internal network 2001:DB8:ACAD:2::/64 to access the Main-Server.

5)     Allow ICMP from Main-Server to the other networks.

6)     Explicitly deny all other traffic from accessing the Main-Server.

c.  Apply the ACL to the Main G0/1 interface.

Answers – Intructions

On Router: Main

en
conf ter
username ISP1 password 321cisco
int s0/0/0
encapsulation ppp
ppp authentication chap
exit

interface tunnel 0
ip address 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.252
tunnel source s0/0/0
tunnel destination 209.165.200.225
exit

router ospf 1
network 192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
exit

router bgp 65020
network 209.165.202.128 mask 255.255.255.224
neighbor 209.165.200.230 remote-as 65001
exit

Access-list 1 permit 192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255

ip access-list extended HTTP_ACCESS
permit tcp 209.165.200.224 0.0.0.3 host 209.165.202.158 eq 80
permit tcp 209.165.200.236 0.0.0.3 host 209.165.202.158 eq 80
permit ip 192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255 any
permit icmp any any echo-reply
deny ip any any

int g0/1
ip access-group HTTP_ACCESS out
exit

ipv6 access-list HTTP6_ACCESS
permit tcp 2001:DB8:ACAD::/63 host 2001:DB8:ACAD:B::158 eq 80
permit tcp 2001:DB8:ACAD:3::/64 host 2001:DB8:ACAD:B::158 eq 80
permit ipv6 2001:DB8:ACAD:2::/64 any
permit icmp any any echo-reply
deny ipv6 any any

interface g0/1
ipv6 traffic-filter HTTP6_ACCESS out

On Router: Remote

en
conf ter
username ISP1 password 321cisco
int s0/0/0
encapsulation ppp
ppp authentication chap
exit

interface tunnel 0
ip address 172.16.1.2 255.255.255.252
tunnel source s0/0/0
tunnel destination 209.165.200.229
exit

router ospf 1
network 192.168.0.0 0.0.1.255 area 0
network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
exit

Access-list 1 permit 192.168.0.0 0.0.1.255

On Router: Other

en
conf ter
Access-list 1 permit 192.168.3.0 0.0.0.255

ip access-list standard VTY_ADMIN
permit 192.168.3.0 0.0.0.255
permit 209.165.200.225 0.0.0.3
deny any
Line vty 0 4
Access-class VTY_ADMIN in

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